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Architectural Digest Seth Anderson Studio feature
ARCHITECTUAL DIGEST 2009

Architectural Digest  “The Architecture Issue”  October 2009

“OPEN AUDITIONS – Our continuing look at designs selected for publication from our Open Auditions held around the country.  This month we present residences in New Jersey, California and New Mexico.”

Seth Anderson-New Mexico.   In the sitting area of the master suite of a 3,200-square-foot Santa Fe house, “flanged windows and a tapered fireplace add subtle detail,” architectural designer Seth Anderson, of Lifdom, notes, “and create a comfortable place to relax.”  The residents may lounge in the Baker Knapp & Tubbs chairs and enjoy a view of a small courtyard; the room opens onto a passageway through which the house’s other four volumes are accessible. Of his clients, Anderson says, “They wanted a structure that was contemporary, with clean lines and hard edges, that maintained a softer sense of home.”

Tapping his experience as a furniture-maker, textile designer and contemporary artist, Anderson orchestrated the home’s blend of traditional pueblo architecture and contemporary lines, Old World finishes and of-the-moment furnishings, and native pottery and modern art, to create an environment with a true sense of place.

Mountain Living
Seth Anderson homebuilder feature Mountain Living
MOUNTAIN LIVING 2011

Mountain Living Magazine January/February 2011

ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN BY LIFDOM
The house that Seth Anderson, owner of Santa Fe-based design firm Lifdom, created for his family stands at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, on the edge of the Tesuque Valley just outside Santa Fe. Like the town, it’s a study in contrasts between old and new; a place where cultures have merged to influence its design. Tapping his experience as a furniture-maker, textile designer and contemporary artist, Anderson orchestrated the home’s blend of traditional pueblo architecture and contemporary lines, Old World finishes and of-the-moment furnishings, and native pottery and modern art, to create an environment with a true sense of place.

MOUNTAIN LIVING: This home seems to be a softer, more contemporary take on pueblo style.

SETH ANDERSON: New Mexico offers an interesting mix of opposing elements and cultures, and I tried to achieve similar contrasts in this house. I incorporated clean, hard-edged, contemporary lines with elements that are very soft, textural and that have a sense of age. Some rooms are very open and expansive, and others are more private and intimate.

ML: The home’s façade appears almost fortress-like. Why did you decide to incorporate that element of traditional pueblo architecture?

SA: This homesite is rather unique in that it has a backdrop of piñon trees and junipers. The house, which is configured almost like an amphitheater, is nestled into the side of that backdrop. It has three layers—a front patio, a main living space and a back patio—and it opens up to a wide expanse off to the north.

ML: It looks like the oversized storefront windows help to create transitions between those layers.

SA: I like the graphicness of them, and their ability to expand the living spaces in a simple, contemporary way.

ML: Tell us about the black-and-white color palette you selected. Was it difficult to avoid the rusty oranges and sandy browns that are so pervasive in Santa Fe design?

SA: I understand why that earthy color palette is such an integral part of the local vernacular, but sometimes it can get a little muddy. In this case, some of those colors were coming in from the outside already, and I wanted to create an environment that feels more fresh and pristine.

ML: The kitchen really seems to exemplify that freshness you were after.

SA:  I wanted the kitchen to have a dramatic but comforting effect because we’re in there so much. There are three large skylights that run the length of the room, so the space is filled with light, which I love. I used a dark ebony finish on the cherry cabinets; the color ties in with the room’s black accents, but you can still see a little bit of the wood grain. When the light hits, it has a reddish hue. This technique of using variations of black adds texture, depth and a feeling of comfort to the room.

ML: How did you choose furnishings to complement this contemporary color palette?

SA:  The architecture is rather understated and I wanted the furnishings to convey that same feeling. But they also had to be very comfortable and luxurious—and kid-friendly. In the den, where the kids play, I used an outdoor fabric that’s hard to mess up. In the master bedroom, I wanted to create a comforting, simplified space. There are more low-lying elements in there and the fabrics are a bit softer—some silk and cashmere and linen.

ML: The library seems to skew more traditional. Is that crown molding we see on the bookcases?

SA: This space was a hidden gem in the house. I began with a few traditional elements: a pair of club chairs that I purchased in Paris and an Oriental rug. Then I decided to go in the opposite direction and incorporate the Ellsworth Kelly, a very clean and minimal piece of art.

ML: What is the secret to incorporating such disparate style elements to create a home that so naturally fits its setting?

SA:  I try to let things kind of flow. Let certain things be dictated to you and you’ll be surprised by the outcome. Your surroundings, the movement of the sun, what’s happening with the trees, what you already own and enjoy, how you live: those are the things that ultimately create a home for you.